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--------------- Print Magazine --------------
 
  May 2016
 
  April 2016
 
 
 
 
GOOD LIVING
HEALTHY FOOD & RECEIPE

Rhubarb

Rhubarb is a perennial herb grown for its attractive succulent rose red, edible leafy stalks. Rhubarb is one of the least caloried vegetables. It holds vital phyto-nutrients such as dietary fibre, poly-phenolic anti-oxidants, minerals, and vitamins. The stalks are rich in several B-complex vitamins such as folates, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine), thiamin, and pantothenic acid. Its stalks also contain healthy levels of minerals like iron, copper, calcium, potassium, and phosphorus. The high amount of dietary fibre found in rhubarb can help in a healthy digestive system by bulking up stool and making sure that bowel movements are smooth and regular. Rhubarb is also a good source of lutein, a compound that has many health benefits. Including plenty of lutein in your diet is a healthy way to take care of your skin and eyes.

 

Rhubarb Curd

Ingredients:

  • 600g rhubarb, washed, trimmed and roughly chopped
  • 4 large eggs
  • 200g butter , diced
  • 4 tbsp cornflour
  • 175g caster sugar
  • curd

Procedure: Put the rhubarb in a blender or food processor and whizz until as fine as it will go. Set a sieve over a bowl, and tip in the rhubarb, pushing pulp with a wooden spoon to get through as much juice as you can. Add the eggs, butter, cornflour, sugar and 250ml rhubarb juice (save the rest) to a pan and set over a very low heat. Whisk until all the butter has melted; then, using a wooden spoon, stir constantly until the curd has thickened to a consistency a little thicker than custard. Do not be tempted to increase the heat to speed up the process, as the eggs will curdle; make sure you stir right around the edge, too, as this is where it might catch first. Sieve the curd into a clean bowl to get rid of any eggy bits that may have curdled. Stir in 100ml more of the reserved juice and a small splash of grenadine if you would like your curd a bit pinker, before chilling. Once cold, taste - add a splash more rhubarb juice if it needs sharpening, then spoon into jars. The curd will keep, stored in the fridge, for up to a week. Eat on scones, crumpets or hot buttered toast, or dollop into sweet pastry cases to make mini curd tarts.

 
 
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